The #1 Official International Association of Shotokan Karate (IASK) website
International Association of Shotokan Karate (IASK Logo)   International Association of Shotokan Karate
 
 
    Special Event ~ What is Karate ~ IASK Etiquette ~ Club Affiliation ~ Comments ~ Useful Links ~ Beginners Courses
1 -» 23 -» 4 -» 5 -» 6 -» 7 -» 8 -» 9 -» 10 -» 11 -» 12 -» 13 -» 14 -» 15 -» 16

Page 8

Taken from an interview on the Karate history of Nicholas B Adamou
By Steave Austin 5thDan

Please note that all information
was correct at time of publishing.

© Copyright 2006 N.B. Adamou

N. Adamou 7thDan, On roof top in Diga, India, 1996.
...Continued from page 7, Nick Adamou
On another occasion, Kanazawa sensei sat on the floor with his legs together, pointing upward at a forty five degree angle. His body was also at a 45 degree angle to the floor and, at a ninety degree angle to his legs, creating a 'V' shape, he asked any student to try to push his legs or body down towards the floor. When a student came up to him and tried, it looked as if he was pushing downward against a solid object like a table or a wall. Another student was invited up to help the first, and still no movement. Kanazawa sensei said that he was able to channel the force of the push, down his body and into the floor through his stomach, thus making the position that he was sitting in even more stable.

On the last day, after the final class of the course, I went along with around twenty five of the other students to a pub nearby with Kanazawa sensei. Somehow and quite by chance, I ended up sitting immediately to the left of Kanazawa sensei which, as an eighteen year old, quite shy person, felt very awkward. During the course of the evening, and after quite a few drinks, I started to feel a bit more relaxed and, as everyone else had been asking Kanazawa sensei so many questions about all kinds of things, I gathered myself together, took another sip of beer and went to ask him a question about karate. It's very strange as, at that very moment, before I had the chance to say "Sensei", he turned to face me, waiting for the question. How on Earth did he know that I was going to say anything because it was very noisy, a typical party atmosphere with lots of talking and laughter. When he turned to face me, I was lost for words and took a gulp of beer. This kind of thing happened about four times with the 'Master' facing the opposite direction after having just listened or spoken to another student and then, at the very moment I was about to say "Sensei" he would turn to face me. Finally, I managed to ask him my question which was about Yoko-Tobi-Geri (flying side thrust kick).

Steve Austin
I believe you said earlier that Kanazawa sensei's work permit lasted only for one year and would expire around March 1966. During that year, how many gradings did you take under him?

N.A.
I took three. The first from white belt to 7th Kyu as I've already mentioned was in July 1965, then I graded to green belt 6th Kyu on 8th November 1965 and on 23rd February 1966 I graded to 5th Kyu purple belt.

S.A.
What happened when Kanazawa sensei's work permit expired?

N.A.
For his own reasons, Dr. Bell wasn't going to renew Kanazawa sensei's contract with the BKF. This meant that Kanazawa sensei would not be in a position to instruct us anymore. We were quite simply, devastated. Whilst this was going on, I think Kanazawa sensei visited France for some weeks and at the same time, some of the higher graded students such as Eddie Whitcher, Mick Randall, Mick Peachey and so on, tried to organise a work permit for Kanazawa sensei. It seemed that, if this couldn't be achieved through the BKF, then it would have to be arranged through a new organisation. A meeting was set up at the Lyndhurst Hall dojo in which Dr. Bell, several BKF members from Liverpool and most of the members from the Lyndhurst Hall dojo in London attended. I never liked meetings and am not sure whether I was at this one. If I was, I have to admit that I recall very little of it. However, I distinctly remember, being at another meeting which was held just a few days later with most of the members of the Lyndhurst Hall dojo. Dr. Bell was not at this meeting. This took place after we had trained and all gathered at the Admiral Napier pub. Those present were Eddie Whitcher, Ray Fuller, Robert Williams, Mick Randall, Mike Peachey, Pauline Laville (now Pauline Bhindra), Chris Adamou, myself and many other students who's names I've forgotten. After much deliberating to find a suitable name which would encompass what the new organisation would represent, Eddie Whitcher came up with; 'Karate Union of Great Britain' (KUGB).

When Kanazawa sensei returned, he became the chief instructor of the KUGB in the south of England with Enoeda sensei in Liverpool and the north. It was around this time that my brother, Chris Adamou founded the Blackfriars dojo and I put up the first month's rent for the new venue which was to become the honbu dojo (Headquarters) of the KUGB in the south of England.

S.A.
Was the honbu dojo at Blackfriars the only KUGB dojo in the south of England?


N.A.
Yes, but in a very short space of time, other clubs soon opened up with Kanazawa sensei as the chief instructor of these. As a purple belt, I was given the task of promoting the KUGB clubs that started up in and around London.

Page 8

1 -» 23 -» 4 -» 5 -» 6 -» 7 -» 8 -» 9 -» 10 -» 11 -» 12 -» 13 -» 14 -» 15 -» 16